Intern’s Insights: 7 steps to the perfect nudge

Nudge Theory utilities the psychological rules and shortcuts that people use on a daily basis. These rules are used to find out where and when to intervene in order to change a negative behaviour an individual is displaying. A common use of nudge theory is in preventing people from displaying negative health behaviours.

7 steps to the perfect nudge

  1. Help the audience into a positive mindset

    Priming: Incorporate some kind of positive/ familiar smells, memories, photos, or anything to trigger the desired frame of mind.

  2. Timing and location are key

    Mental Accounting: Encourage them to rethink their allocated spending by appearing in places where they are deciding how to spend their money. Then convince them as to the benefits of spending it on your product.

    Changes to physical environment: These may affect their mood, so think about where they are when they hear about the product.

    Emotional appeal: Trigger some emotion in them through a nudge, or find a time at which they are emotional in which to target them with a nudge.

  3. Make the decision for them

    Mindless Choosing: Eliminate alternative options, make this a choice they don’t need to make.

    Path of least resistance: Make the product or service the easiest option, in comparison to alternatives, remove the need for effort.

    Choice Architecture: Place product where people will see them/ experience them.

  4. Tell them what others are doing

    Optimism & overconfidence: People hold a bias that they are better than average, so play on this feeling when promoting a product to them.

    Comparison: Make alternatives seem complicated compared to neighbours.

    Herd Behaviour: Conformity (target farmers union), train people in groups to create a sense of a norm.

    Social Norms: How to normalise a behaviour- visible use of products- pads on line, Roots fertile field, solar lights to travel at night.

    Status quo bias: Make something the norm e.g. targetting younger people/ children before they familiarise themselves with an existing norm.

  5. Link it to something they already trust

    Positive Association: Link onto an existing product or concept that already has a positive reputation. The positive view will then be attached to your own product.

  6. Tell them what they could lose

    Framing: Use smart wording, make it look like the odds are in your favour, reverse statistics.

    Loss aversion: The fear of losing something is a twice as strong as the pleasure gained from gaining something.

  7. Ensure they verbally commit to desired actions

    Implementation Intentions: When someone verbally states they intend to perform a certain action, it has been shown that they are far more likely to take that action. However, it is essential that they including precise details such as where, when, and how.

Beckie Thomas FRSA

Marketing Communications Internship

Interns Insights: Remote-working for a social enterprise

Marketing for a social enterprise

Interning for a company with such a diverse portfolio of social franchises means you are engaged with a variety of social issues on a daily basis. It was a great experience working with an organisation who are providing sustainable solutions to social issues. One who is quite deliberately contributing to the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals.

Working as Marketing and Communications Officer I learnt more about social media strategies, writing press releases, speaking to journalists, brand design, nudge theory, and marketing to developing communities. I made first links with contacts using elevator pitches, and gained expertise in simplifying the business model explanation. The fact I was remote-working for all of this provided an extra challenge in ensuring I stayed in constant communication with my team.

With WSV there is the added advantage of being able to network with both the business community, as well as charities- and knowing that you have something to offer to both. All of this was made all the more valuable because, when sharing the message of a social enterprise, you know that you are doing social good. It felt incredibly positive to know WSV are not providing aid, which can make developing communities dependent on this support, instead they are providing people with a business which they can use to support their families and communities.

The Royal Society of Arts

For 4 weeks I worked part-time at the Royal Society of Arts in London. I used the open working space, met interesting people and helpful staff, and used the library space and facilities. During my internship I became a fellow of the RSA due to my work so far in social enterprise at university. Becoming a fellow connects you to a network of 28,000 people across the world whom you can contact for collaboration/guidance. I would recommend it if you are interested in social progress.

Start-up-life

Working for a start up was a dynamic and fast paced experience. There are very few obstacles slowing you down. Processes are streamlined, and meetings are efficient. As a small team, we socialised at lunchtimes, got to know each other, recognised each other’s strengths, collaborated on ideas and projects, and shared expertise and knowledge. Working as a team in this way made the experience so much more useful, as six minds are always better than one!

Tips on remote-working

Remote-working teaches you to manage your time, maintain motivation, and reach out to colleagues for information whenever needed. Here are a few lessons I took from the experience:

  • Morning and afternoon goals- Set yourself a main goal for each morning and afternoon, and stick to them. Other things will come along, but you need to get your big ‘rocks’ in first.
  • Colour code progress- If you’re a visual learner, like me, use a traffic light system to keep track of your progress on goals.
  • Sync your deadlines– If one of your deadlines relies on someone else meeting theres, check in with them regularly so that you can adjust your workload accordingly.
  • Remember no question is silly. It’s always better to contact a colleague to check detail than to make a mistake. Especially in a marketing role.

 

Beckie Thomas FRSA

Marketing Communications Internship